Greg Taylor spent 17 years in prison for a murder he did not commit.

A precedent setting hearing set him free and rocked North Carolina’s criminal justice system.

This landmark case highlights a groundbreaking legal process needed nationwide. The time is now.

How criminal justice
reform freed Greg Taylor

Greg Taylor spent 17 years in prison
for a brutal murder he did not commit.

A precedent setting hearing set him free and rocked
North Carolina’s criminal justice community.

This landmark case highlights a groundbreaking
legal process needed nationwide.

We are happy to announce that In Pursuit of Justice has been licensed to The Video Project. Founded in 1983, The Video Project’s mission is to provide the best media programming available on critical social and global issues to classrooms and communities to help advance awareness and encourage action on the most important concerns of our times.

Their collection features programs from over 200 independent filmmakers, including Oscar and Emmy winners, as well as films that aired on Showtime, HBO and PBS.

The good news is that In Pursuit of Justice is now available for noncommercial community screenings, for instance at churches, discussion groups, and other venues for $89. The Video Project will also represent our film in the Educational/institutional market.

This is a big step for us and we hope that, through this relationship, the film will begin to bring the message about true criminal justice reform to the entire country.
Gratefully, Gregg Jamback & Jamie Huss / Producers

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In Pursuit of Justice, set in North Carolina, is a criminal justice documentary with a unique answer to wrongful convictions nationwide.

The Taylor Family

Greg Taylor, his parents, sister, and younger brother

Our story begins September 25, 1991, when Greg, out partying with a friend, Johnny Beck, gets his truck stuck in a muddy field. At 3:30AM, as they walk out of the field, they pass the brutally beaten body of Jacquetta Thomas. Fewer than 18 hours later, both are arrested for Jacquetta’s murder.

Greg and his family fought the system for 17 years. They sacrificed hours of time, spent over $130,000, and were denied at every judicial level. Without hope, Greg steeled himself to spending the rest of his life in prison.

Meanwhile, conservative North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice I. Beverly Lake, Jr. and his law clerk, Chris Mumma, were examining the causes of wrongful convictions. Their work led a politically divided state legislature to establish the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission – a state supported, independent agency that has the power to completely investigate claims of innocence. Greg’s case is historic – he’s the first person in the country to be freed through this unique legal process.

Greg’s story teaches us wrongful convictions can happen to anyone, and there are effective, reasonable reforms that can dramatically improve our criminal justice system. Each one of us is also a potential juror with a obligation to understand how our legal system works, the weaknesses that need strengthening in that system, and how our decisions can impact others’ lives.

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Greg Taylor – Ghost

tells the story of Greg’s time in prison and his lost relationship with his daughter.
Footage that’s not in IPOJ!
You can stream ($3.99) or download ($9.99) Ghost by clicking the link below.

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